What can you do with 1 euro in Indonesia

Some people, when they arrive to Indonesia, feel like millionaires. Here, everything is counted by thousands and millions. In Indonesia there are only 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 thousands banknote and 100, 200, 500, 1 000 coins. Paradox but more than 57% of all Indonesian inhibits earn till 1,78 EUR per day.

Money are using not only for shopping
Indonesians cure fever with metal coins. They scratch the back with coins for wind get out from the body. Indonesians believe that wind, makes them get fever and metal coins attracts bad spirits. This “procedure” (others say it “massage”) called “kerok”.

As well, like probably in many countries, money is given like presents.

In the end of Ramadhan, during Idul-Fitri, when relatives visiting relatives, if in the family there are any kids – guests brings colorful envelopment with money inside (usually 10 000 Rp – ~0,69 EUR) for kids. Even before this celebration banks specially is changing big amount of cash to smaller. Nobody surprised when kids, during Idul-Fitri, comes to guests and showing their wallets (asking money).

In the traditional Muslim weddings you rare will see guests with flowers or presents. Almost everyone brings envelopment with money. When you come, first of all you need to “register” in guest book and beside this book is always stands the box to put the money. There are not written rules how much you need to put, but it’s good gesture if one person brings at least 50 000 Rp (~3,43 EUR).

Before Christmas, Catholics in Indonesia are used to give money for kids like a present. The amount is ~20 000 Rp (1,37 EUR). It should be new banknote in beautiful envelopment. Some street sellers, especially for Christmas sells new banknote already packed. Of course for this “service” you need to pay extra ~2 000–5 000 Rp (0,14–0,34 EUR).

Different prices in different cities and for different people
For example, in Yogyakarta prices are ~1,5 times less than in Jakarta or Bali island.
As well different prices sellers gives for local people and for foreigners. Even if you already know how to barge in Indonesian language, still usually the final sum will be a bit bigger than for locals. Some Indonesians even don’t hide, that foreigners they see like walking ATM’s, so they try to take as much as possible cash from them :).

What can you do with 1 euro in Indonesia?
So what is possible to buy for 1 EUR in Yogyakarta city? Like EUR currency all the time changing let’s take average -1 EUR=14 500 Rp.

  • Eat food in local restaurant “Rumah makan” (where is menu from which you can choose).
    1 portion simple rise (“nasi putih”), fried mushrooms (“jamur goreng”), sambal sause with guava natural juice – 13 500 Rp (0,93 EUR).
  • Have a dish in street restaurant “Warung makan” (food made and putted in the window, there are no menu, you take what is putted)
    1 portion simple rice, vegetables (“sayur”), 2 balls of smash potatoes (“perkedel”), 1 chicken thigh in sweet suce (“ayam bakar”) and natural guava juice – 14 000 Rp (0,96 EUR).
  • Eat in street restaurant (where you see how food is preparing for you)
    1 portion fried rise (“nasi goreng” – called national Indonesian dish) with chicken scrap, omelet, several vegetables and cold drink  “es jeruk” – 11 000 Rp (0,76 EUR).
  • Take away food from street vendors “kaki-lima”.
    1 portion rice cooked in coconut oil (“nasi uduk”), 2 peace “tempeh” and 2 peace of “tahu” – 7 000 Rp (0,48 EUR).

It’s really possible to find where to eat cheaper but I don’t go to places where I see that food is made and kept not in the best conditions :)

If you don’t have big requirements for food and don’t eat big portions, per day in Yogyakarta is possible to eat 3 times for 24 000 Rp (1,65 EUR): for breakfast instant coffee and 4 coffee cake; for lunch – rice, vegetables, chicken, simple drink; for dinner – rice, “tahu” and “tempeh”.

What possible to buy for 1 EUR in Surabaya city? (Thank you Abriani Ori Ratnasari for information)
1 EUR  Abriani calculate like 15 000 Rp. Here is the list what you can do with 1 EUR:

  • Buy food in KFC “goceng package”. You can choose: ice cream, soup, love float, melon float, grape float, burger and others.
  • Buy food: rice, chicken and ice tea – 5 000 Rp (0,33 EUR)
  • Buy books
  • Buy pensil case
  • Buy ticket for public transportation like “angkot” or bus – it’s only 5 000 Rp (0,33 EUR) one way, for 1 person
  • Buy 3 underwear units (for girls)

More things what can you do with 1 euro

  • Eat sandwich with cobra meat– 13 000 Rp (0,89 EUR).
  • Order 2 natural juice in local restaurant – 10 000-14 000 Rp (0,69-0,96 EUR).
  • Try Robusta coffee from Flores island in local restaurant– 10 000 Rp (0,69 EUR).
  • In small shop buy 13 packages of instant coffee – 13 000 Rp (0,89 EUR).
  • In small shop buy 10 packages of instant noodles (Indonesians just love this ”dish”)– ~14 000 Rp (0,96 EUR).
  • Buy ~ 1,2 kilo simple rice – ~14 000 Rp (0,96 EUR).
  • In big supermarket buy “Coca cola” 1,5 l – 13 000 Rp (0,89 EUR). Or in small shop buy 3 small bottles (425 ml) – 12 000 Rp (0,82 EUR).
  • Buy 4 bottles of water in not touristic are (500 ml) – 12 000 Rp (0,82 EUR).
  • Buy 1 kilo tomatoes and cucumber in local market – 14 000 Rp (0,96 EUR) (locals can buy cheaper ;)).
  • Buy 1-2 kilo of seasonal fruits (banana, mango…) – 7 000-13 000 Rp (0,48-0,96 EUR).
  • In small shop buy food „package“ – 2 packages of instat coffee, pie, jam – 13 500 Rp (0,93 EUR) or 0,5 kilo of rice, small package of sauce and 2 pieces of “tahu” and “tempeh” – 13 500 Rp (0,93 EUR).
  • Put the fuel almost 2 l in petrol station – 14 800 Rp (1,02 EUR).
  • Buy bus ticket from Yogyakarta to Magelang city – 13 000 Rp (0,89 EUR).
  • With “becak” go short distance (that takes no longer than 10 min.) – 10 000 Rp (0,69 EUR).
  • Pay for motorbike parking 7-14 times – 14 000 Rp (0,96 EUR). The price depends where you want to park – touristic places more expensive.
  • Go with taxi ~2-4 km – 12 000-14 400 Rp (0,82-0,99 EUR).
  • Buy local cigarettes 1-2 (with „kretek“) – 8 000-14 000 Rp (0,55-0,96 EUR).
  • Buy small souvenirs in Malioboro street, for example T-shirt– 13 000 Rp (0,89 EUR)
  • Visit 1 person, 1 time Sultan palace “Kraton” – 13 500 Rp (0,93 EUR) or Water castle “Taman sari” – 14 000 Rp (0,96 EUR).
  • Put to mobile “pulsa”– 11 000 Rp (0,76 EUR).
  • Buy cleaning stuff for home, for example in small shop liquid for cleaning the floor – 9 700 Rp (0,67 EUR).
  • Buy hygienic stuff (in small shop): tooth paste, soap, wet napkins – 13 700 Rp (0,94 EUR).
  • Take laundry service for ~5,5 kilos – 13 750 Rp (0,94 EUR).
  • Buy 1 pair of slippers – 12 000 Rp (0,82 EUR).

And some other things possible to do with 1 EUR ;).

Per day, if not spread out the money, possible to live for ~ 30 000 Rp (2,06 EUR). That’s why mostly people use banknotes of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 thousand. Those banknotes are mostly dirty and damage. Sometimes I see when locals get new banknote of 2 000 Rp, they are smiling while looking at them, because not many new banknotes you can see of such amount.

As well, sometimes it’s happens (especially in small shop) when they don’t have back change, they give back small candies (I really don’t like it). But when I tried once in the same shop pay with the same candies – I didn’t manage :D

What you managed to buy with 1 euro in Indonesia?


Useful? Great! :) You might also like these:

How to save some money before going to Indonesia
How much cost live in Yogyakarta
How to save money in Indonesia

 



 

How to save money in Indonesia

In Indonesia many foreigners feels like millionaires like here everything counted in thousands and millions. In one hand (comparing with Europe countries or others) in Indonesia you can say that everything is cheap but in another hand – when you live here longer and only from scholarship amount – you need to start to count and make some savings. So here is my recommendations how to save money during the stay in Indonesia. It’s just advices, nothing is mandatory. Even if I mentioned a lot about Darmasiswa scholarship, still everyone can save some money – foreigners students, travelers or employees. Also you will figure out something for yourself as well, after you spend some time in Indonesia.

Notice: all the prices written according 05 2015 information and from Yogyakarta south area.

Home

  • Renting: try to agree to rent the place for first 6 months and then extend renting 3 months more, like in summer you most probably will travel more than staying at home. Your stuff you can ask to keep in other Darmasiswa student’s house. If owner wants to rent for 12 months, try to negotiate to rent only 9 months then you can save some money for travels or other things.
  • Empty place or not enough things that you need:
    • First, asks the owner of the place, maybe she/he have and not use things that you need.
    • Check “Facebook” groups of Darmasiswa students, maybe somebody sells things that you need or put ad what you are searching for.
    • Check second hand shops (for furniture, electrical devices and etc.). You can find there cheaper stuff, but before compare similar stuff prices in regular shops. Maybe the differences of the price between new and second hand won’t be so big and in shop you will get guarantee, second hand shops doesn’t give it.
    • Some of the things you can make by yourself, for example bamboo shelter, you just need idea, measurements, bamboo and ropes. All tools you can borrow from the house owner or neighbors.
    • Sometimes Indonesian people, if doesn’t use things, leaves in front their house – if you will see something that you need, before taking just ask if you can take it for free.
    • If you need just one piece of something (bamboo, rock or whatever else) just ask to take it for free, therefore can bring some cookies.
    • If you would like sometimes to cook but at home don’t have stove, buy small travel stove. You can use it at home and will be useful for the camping or longer trips. If you won’t use it frequently – can rent it for other student’s trips.
  • Drinking water: check in different places the prices of new gallon and refills. Like in some places you can find cheaper than in others. Different brands have distinctively different tastes, so try different and choose that you like best.
  • Electricity:
    • Turn off all equipment that you don’t use for a night (for example water dispenser) or during you are leaving, traveling.
    • If the owner will ask pay monthly agreed sum with old electricity counter, ask to show the counter numbers and pay only for amount that you use (but ask this in the polite way, like such request can be understood like you are not trust the owner, calling them a thief).
    • For the new counter – you can buy at once bigger amount prepaid card (“pulsa”) of electricity.
  • Gas: check in different places the prices of new gallon and refills. Like in some places you can find cheaper than in others. Depends on the size of gallon will be different price.
  • Internet: if near around your place is any free Wi-Fi spot (in coffee places with Wi-Fi enough to order a drink) – go there to use internet instead of buying internet modem (if you are not internet addicted). Before decide to buy modem ask local students which operator they are using. Like some operators have better connection in one area than in another. So don’t take operator that has worst connection in your area. You can ask local students maybe somebody has internet modem that they don’t use. So they can sell you cheaper or give for free. For example I bought internet modem from local student for 150 000 Rp and the same one, new in the shop costs 270 000 Rp. In providers client service offices managers put “pulsa” without fee.
  • Textile: if you want to cover something or to buy curtains and etc. you can make it by yourself – there are places where you can buy textile by kilos or buy material in shops. There are many places that can sew for you what you want. It will cheaper than to buy already sewed stuff in the shop and you will have exactly what you want and need.

Food

  • Cook at home: if you calculate that cheaper to cook at home than eat in “warungs” – do it. The main thing, if you don’t have fridge the food won’t be fresh couple of days. The fruits are fresh in Indonesia, so you need it eat during maximum couple days, otherwise ants and other insects will make their job :D
  • Markets/ small shops: buy food and small stuffs in nearest market (better to visit in early morning till ~8:00 am) or in small shops near your place. For me was surprise that the same stuffs in big supermarkets are more expensive than in small ones. As well check couple of different small shops, sometimes even in the same street different shops sells cheaper the same stuff.
  • Neighbors: if it’s possible buy fruits, vegetables or other stuff from neighbors. It will make stronger relationship with neighbors as well you can get better price.
  • “Warungs”: eat in “warungs” in small streets. Check some streets around your place. Sometimes “warungs” in front of busy streets are more expensive than in small streets. For example “soto” (rice soup) in small street “warung” cost ~ 6 000 Rp, in bigger street ~ 10 000 Rp.
  • Imported food: everywhere imported food will be expensive. If you need some spices for your cooking (like oregano and etc.) ask to send your family from home country – probably in your country it’s more cheaper than here.

Clothes

  • Misfit: if you have some clothes that not fit you anymore, damage some parts and etc. instead of buying new, you can try to make from it something else. For example from pans – shorts, T-shirt with sleeves – without sleeves and etc.
  • Dislike: if you dislike some of your clothes, you can organize clothes exchange between other students. They will have as well things that they don’t wear anymore – so you can just change, instead of buying new ones.

Travels

  • KITAS (“Kartu Izin Tinggal Terbatas” – temporary stay permit card): to most of the visiting places you will get bigger discount with KITAS than with student card. So be patient and visit for example Borobudur after you will get KITAS.
  • Couchsurfing.com: during the travels stay in “couchsurfing” members places.
  • Local friends: ask you Indonesian friends maybe they have relatives of friends in place where you are planning to go, so maybe you could stay in their place, rent cheaper a motorbike and etc.
  • Time: go to trips during rainy season – the prices will be cheaper and in different islands rainy season is different. For example in January, when in Java was raining a lot, in Lombok island 3 weeks during my trip – wasn’t any rain.

Other

    • Ask local students which operator they are using, like mostly they are using the cheapest one and that has good connection in the exact area. But the cheapest one – sometimes means not the best quality of connection and sometimes can’t be reachable in some areas.
    • Before choosing operator answer yourself what you need mostly – write SMS, use internet in mobile and something else? Compare some operators prices by your requirements and then choose,
    • Instead of writing SMS you can use “Watsapp”, “Viber” like Indonesians use this programs more often that writes SMS and also it will be cheaper.
    • Put at once bigger amount of prepaid sum “pulsa” – like every time to put “pulsa” (for service) will cost.
    • Talk with local peoples/neighbors: usually they knows someone who can help you, knows someone who have something and etc. – so you can get things a bit cheaper.
  • Fuel for motorbikes: put the fuel in petrol stations it will be cheaper around ~500 – 1 500 Rp per liter than buy in the streets from bottles. In the evening the petrol stations can be closed, so take care to put fuel before, because at night people who are selling fuel in bottles asks more money than during the day time.
  • Natural products: instead of buying some chemicals product you can try to use naturals ones.
    • For example if your home floor is made from cement and it dusty, use coconut cutting – it will make your floor darker and the dust won’t stuck.
    • From coconut milk you can make some products for your skin, hairs (in internet there is many recipes).
    • To clean oily hands you can use plant (in bahasa Indonesian) “kemangi”.
    • Instead of buying air fresher for bathroom – use coffee, it will observe all bad smells in bathroom.
    • Talk with elder neighbors – they will give you many advices for what to use natural products.
  • Before buying anything: spend some time to check some different places and compare the prices of the same stuff. It can help you to save some money especially when you will just arrive and will need to buy some stuff as well for things that you are planning to buy quite often.
  • Laundry: if you don’t want to pay for laundry service – clean your stuff by yourself. To dry it during the rainy season will be a bit more difficult but possible.
  • Parking: usually the motorbike parking cost 1 000 – 2 000 Rp (other places and 3 000). If you are going somewhere with a friend with 1 motorbike (for example shopping in supermarket) the friend can stay on motorbike and you take all stuffs that needed – in such case the parking guys won’t charge you for parking fee.

 

The main tip how to save money – negotiate the price anywhere, anytime.

  • If you know that some things you will buy all the time, try to buy in the same seller to show your locality and ask to get those things cheaper.
  • Barge the price in second hand shops, markets. Like first price will be given like for foreigner, better even go with local friend, ask him to barge the price.
  • Ask a discount in transport and any other places – like you are student can show your student card.
  • If in the shop there are no price tags – you can negotiate the price.

Do you know other ways how to save money in Indonesia? Share your advice and help others! :)

Useful? Great! :) You might also like these:

Other useful information
What you can do with 1 EUR in Indonesia
Cost of living in Indonesia



Interesting facts about Indonesia

Before coming to Indonesia, I didn’t know much about this country. But after I started to search information, I was surprised how “rich” is Indonesia :). Even some of the facts became my travel destination. I hope these interesting facts about Indonesia will be useful for you as well:

Nature:

  • The country is 2nd after Brazil with the highest level of biodiversity in the world.
  • The Mount Tambora erupted in 1815, which is the world’s most powerful volcanic eruption. It affected the global climate to such an extent that it was called “year without summer”.
  • Indonesia has the smallest fish in the world named the Paedocypris progenetica, with a length of 7.9 mm and found in a Sumatra muddy swamp.
  • Indonesia has the world’s longest snake called the Python Reticulates, which is ~7 meters long and can be found on Sulawesi island.
  • Indonesia has the world’s smallest primate named the Tarsier Pygmy (Tarsius pumilus), also known as the Mountain Tarsier, whose length is only 10 cm. This animal looks like a monkey and lives on trees found in Sulawesi island.
  • Indonesia has the world’s largest flower called the Rafflesia Arnoldi, which has a diameter of up to 1 m during the blossom phase. Reaching 5ft high and 4ft wide, it only blooms for 3 days and for 8 hours of these 3 days, the flower gives out the rotting flesh smell. Found in Borneo and Sumatra islands.
  • Indonesia has the only living ancient dragon, Komodo, which can be found in Komodo island. Komodo dragon, the world’s largest lizard, is an endemic species of Indonesia; the creature is also the national animal of the country.
  • Javan rhinoceros is an animal that lives only in Indonesia; in any other part of the world you will not see this animal.
  • Indonesia has the largest mangrove forest in the world. The main benefit of mangroves is to prevent erosion by sea water.
  • Indonesia has the world’s largest amount of orchid biodiversity. There are about 6 000 species of orchids, ranging from the largest (Tiger Orchid or Grammatophyllum Speciosum) to the smallest (Taeniophyllum, which has no leaves). The collection also includes the Black Orchid, which is extremely rare and can only be found in Papua.
  • Indonesia has the largest number of shark species, which is approximately 150 species.
  • Indonesia is the world’s richest in term of most extensive coral reefs. It has about 18% of the total coral reefs around the world.
  • With more than 450 different bird species, Java Island is a bird watcher’s paradise.
  • Sumatra is the biggest island of Indonesia, which comes under the Greater Sunda Islands. It is also the 6th largest and the fifth highest island in the whole world.
  • If you wanted to spend one day on every single Indonesian island, you’d need more than 45 years.
  • By land mass size, Java is the world’s 13th largest island, and 5th largest Indonesian Island. It was formed mainly by volcanic eruptions and has an east-west chain of them along the island.
  • The main island Java is as big as New York State. Java is split into four provinces: East Java, Central Java, West Java, and Banten.
  • Puncak Jaya is the highest point in Indonesia, situated in the highlands of Papua.
  • At the top of the Indonesian volcano Kelimutu situated three lakes, each of which periodically changes color from turquoise to green, red and black. Such transformations are caused by volcanic gases, which react with a variety of minerals dissolved in the water, thereby changing the color of the lakes.
  • Certain fruits of Indonesia make foreigners curious. These fruits seem strange as they have no name in the foreigner’s language and they never knew it existed. The Durian fruit is one of them which is known to be the king of fruits. Salak (“snake fruit”) and Duku are some other examples of such “strange” fruits.

People:

  • Indonesian people take it easy and slow. Indonesia is near the bottom of the ranking in “speed of walk” among all the country in the world. Even though people in Jakarta are as busy as other workers in other big cities of the world, their speed when walking is notably slow. If there is Japanese/Western people who also live in Jakarta and walk among us Indonesian, you would spot them immediately, because their speed stands out.
  • The most important thing in Indonesia is not really “success” or hard-work or be of use for those around them. It’s being happy and loves their life. They don’t need big money as long as their life and their family are peaceful and easy. Maybe “take it easy and enjoy the risk” are the motto. The thing is, this attitude toward life is what makes them suffer the most. Sadly, they won’t change. They won’t put big effort but because they want their life to be easy, they have a lot of demand. And granted, it’s not being fulfilled.
  • In Java island locals can often ask you to be photographed with them. The standard phrase “Hello misterrr, photo?” Even if you the girl, they will call you the same – “Mister”. Like in their language doesn’t exist “she/he” only “dia” that’s why sometimes for Indonesians hard to remember which gender is “Mister”, which is “Miss”.
  • Rice is the main food staple in Indonesia. Indonesian at least once per day should eat rice to feel full; usually they eat rice 3 times per day.
  • Balinese are named according to their birth order. The 1st is Wayan, the 4th is Ketut and if you are the 5th, it goes back to Wayan.
  • The small Indonesian Hindu population mostly lives on the western island of Bali. Balinese Hinduism is steeped in ancient superstitions. They never let a baby’s feet touch the ground for the first six months, to prevent the devil entering the child. This means that babies are continually passed around like hot potatoes by relatives.
  • Almost everyone in Bali has their teeth filed down. They believe that the essence of the 6 vices (jealousy, anger, confusion, drunkenness, desire and greed) enters the body through the top 6 teeth, so by filing away their “demonic” ends, the vices are thwarted and entry to heaven is guaranteed.
  • Most of the time, as often in Asia, Indonesian people are not used to read map.
  • Indonesian people do not use toilet paper, but they wash oneself with water, always available in WC in Indonesia. Indonesian people use the left hand to wash themselves, while they keep the right hand to shake hands and to eat. If you cannot do without toilet paper, always keep with you a package of tissues.
  • Indonesian mostly eats with hands. Do not use your left hand, and try to use only the first three fingers (thumb, forefinger, and middle finger). Wash your hands before and after eating with the finger bowl which is put on the table. Indonesian use to eat fast and silently.

Other:

  • Name “Indonesia” was first used by the British in the mid-19th century. It comes from the Greek “nesos” (island) and Indus, the Latin name for the land beyond the Indus river, which was derived from the Sanskrit name for that river: Sindhu. Dutch colonists didn’t like “Indonesia”, preferring Dutch East Indies or Malayan Archipelago. As a result, it was adopted by the anti-colonial movement in the early 20th century.
  • The oldest hominid in the world, Pithecanthropus Erectus, is found in Indonesia. Its origin is dated way back from 1.8 million years ago.
  • Another early human being, Homo floresiensis (“Flores Man”, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flo”) is the possible species, now extinct, in the genus Homo. The remains were discovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia.
  • The country is so expansive in its area covered that it has 3 time zones. It is one of the countries that have not been fully explored or mapped.
  • Indonesia is a major producer of cloves and nutmeg (It’s used in cooking, as medicine and as a hallucinogen). Nutmeg is native to Indonesia’s Banda islands and ranked first in the world in terms of production.
  • Indonesia is the largest exporter of plywood, which makes up 80% of the supply to the world.
  • In the markets and in some shops there are no price tags, it is possible to bargain and make a price lower by two-three times.
  • Usually the shops, eating places doesn’t show their working hours, so one day they can open and close in one time, next day in another.
  • One of the world’s unique funeral processions takes place in a Toraja, a small town in Sulawesi island. Funeral procession will took around 7 days and cost a fortune. That’s why families usually save up their money for years before they can bury their loved ones. The dead bodies they are keeping in their house.
  • Movies in cinemas and on television, never duplicated in the local language. Movies are shown in the original with Indonesian subtitles.
  • “Nasi goreng” is Indonesian fried rice dish that is the world’s 2nd most beloved food as per a CNN poll and also known as national dish of Indonesia.
  • It is the world’s largest producer of palm oil, 40% of which is set aside for use as biofuel. It also exports 3,000 tons of frogs’ legs to France each year.
  • The green spaces are not so common in Indonesia. Some cities have the city center arranged as a park, green space for people, which is nice, but other than that, you have to search and discover your own places where you can take a rest.

The facts that you probably already know:

  • “Unity in Diversity” is the national motto of Indonesia.
  • The flag of Indonesia is similar to the flag of Monaco. Like the Indonesian flag, the flag of Monaco also has two equal horizontal bands of red (top) and white.
  • The total land area of Indonesia places it at the 15th position in the world. Flying from one end to the other, from North Sumatra to West Papua, takes over 12 hours of flying time.
  • In terms of population, Indonesia is the 4th largest country in the world (after China, India and United States) with over 253 million (2014) people.
  • About half the population of Indonesia lives on less than US $2 per day and the unemployment rate here is almost 10%.
  • With a population of 143 million, Java is the home of 57% of the Indonesian population, and is the most populous island on Earth.
  • In Indonesia there are around 300 ethnic groups.
  • The Indonesian Constitution guarantees freedom of religion but the government only recognizes 6 official religions (Islam, Protestantism, Catholicism, Hinduism, Buddhism and Confucianism). On the island of Java, more than 90% of the people are Muslims, on a broad continuum between abangan (more traditional) andsantri (more modernist). Some parts of south-central Java are strongly Roman Catholic and Buddhist communities exist in Java’s major cities.
  • Jakarta (capital city) with a population of more than 10 million is one of the world’s most densely populated cities.
  • Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia) is the national language of Indonesia, used in schools and other state-run enterprises, as well as in the media. However, Indonesia as over 700 indigenous languages, meaning that many Indonesians are bilingual, speaking their indigenous language at home and Indonesian at work or school.
  • Indonesia is a very diverse country in terms of culture and around 583 languages and dialects are spoken in the country.
  • During World War II, the Japanese invaded and occupied Indonesia.
  • The Dutch kept Indonesia colonized for almost 350 years, owing to the fact that many old Indonesians speak Dutch fluently. Many Indonesian words have been derived from Dutch.
  • During the colonial periods of the 17th century, the Dutch introduced the cultivation of commercial plants in Java, including sugarcane, rubber, tea and coffee. In the 19th and early 20th century, Javanese coffee gained global popularity. This is in fact why the name “Java” is commonly considered being synonymous with coffee.
  • Indonesia was formerly known as Dutch East Indies.
  • Indonesia became the member of the United Nations in the year 1950 and today it is the signatory to the ASEAN Free Trade Agreement, the Cairns group, and the WTO.
  • There are around 17,500 islands in Indonesia (out of which 6,000 of these islands are inhabited) taking up almost the same space as the United States. New Guinea, Borneo (also known as Kalimantan), and Sumatra island are on the list of the top ten largest Islands in the world.
  • There are over 150 volcanoes in Indonesia. 127 of them are active. Records at least 3 earthquakes per day.
  • Indonesia is a part of “The Ring of Fire”, the volcano group. About 75% of the volcanoes of the Ring of Fire are in Indonesia.
  • Almost 60% of the country is covered with forests.
  • Indonesia sits on both sides of the equator (the line cuts across islands Sumatra, Sulawesi and Kalimantan along with a few other small Islands in the middle of the country). Experiences tropical climate year round and its average temperature do not fluctuate much throughout the year. Average range of the temperature remains between 26-30 degrees Celsius.
  • Indonesia has a biggest Buddhist temple in the world – Borobudur, built in 9th century.
  • 2 sports that are the most popular among Indonesians are badminton and soccer. Illegal gambling of sports is on the rise in the country.
  • The Indonesian industry mainly imports chemicals, fuels, food-stuffs, and machinery and equipment’s while electrical appliances, rubber, plywood, oil and gas, and textile are the main export products here.
  • Tourism is the main industry of Indonesia. The country attracts hordes of tourists and nature lovers from all across the globe for its pristine tropical forest and culture of the people.
  • 20% of liquid natural gas in the world is produced in Indonesia and country is the largest supplier worldwide.
  • In Indonesia left-side traffic.
  • Indonesian loves spicy foods! Order a pizza or hamburger here; you will get some sambal packages.
  • The most expensive coffee in the world – Kopi Luwak is from Indonesia. Coffee beans that are eaten by civets and digested before being brewed.

Here are more 5 facts about Indonesia from indahs.com

Do you know more interesting facts? Share with us :)

Information and most of the pictures used from internet sources.

Interesting? Great! :) You might also like these:

Indonesian people lifestyle
How to do things in Indonesian style
Indonesian discoveries